Research on Using Video Games to Train Brain Functions

In an online interview at Sharpbrains.com, Neuroscientist Dr. Michael Posner shares about some new research on ways to train self-regulation and attentions skills. From the interview: Dr. Posner, many thanks for your time today. I really enjoyed the James Arthur Lecture monograph on Evolution and Development of Self-Regulation that you delivered last year. Could you…

Edutopia June 2008: New Media Helps Learning

Edutopia has a fantastic June issue with a focus on using new media in education. In particular, they have a video about Albano Berberi, a blind high school student who uses assistive technology to do things like computer programming, video-game playing, and composing musical scores that he then performs on violin. Here is a link…

Shaffer and Gee Talk Video Games and Education

This is a wonderfully illuminating discussion about video games and education. The discussion is between David Williamson Shaffer, author of How Computer Games Help Children Learn and James Paul Gee, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and author of Why Video Games are Good for the Soul. The overriding message from Shaffer and Gee:…

EF as the New Standard for Brain Function

An article in this week’s Newsweek by Wray Herbert describes some fascinating research being done on enhancing preschool education by focusing the curriculum specifically to improve executive functions. From the article: […] Psychologist Adele Diamond of the University of British Columbia has been testing the EF concept in the classroom, with provocative results. In one…

Using Video Games as Discussion Material for Anger Management

Rebecca Bell, Ph.D. has a fascinating post about how she uses discussion of video games to teach anger management. The post starts off talking about dating a pirate, who was a pirate in more ways than one, and goes on to explain how she uses discussion of video games as a way to get kids…

What is the Deal with Video Games and Violence?

In 2004, Lawrence Kutner, PhD, and Cheryl K. Olson, ScD, cofounders and directors of the Harvard Medical School Center for Mental Health and Media, started doing research on the effects of video games. With $1.5 million in federal funding from The US Department of Justice, Kutner and Olson set off on an mission to review…